Foreign Auto Service Cincinnati

SAM SMYTH IMPORTED CAR SERVICE, INC. 8773 REMINGTON ROAD CINCINNATI OHIO 45242 IND. Specialist

SMYTH IMPORTS IS AN INDEPENDENT SERVICE FACILITY THAT PROVIDES COST EFFECTIVE RESTORATION, SERVICE, MAINTENANCE, REPAIR, AND HISTORY

Foreign cars range from those designed and built in places like Mumbai, India home of TATA Motors, Leicester, England home of Noble Automotive, Stuggart, Germany home of Porsche and Mercedes, Crewe, England home of Bentley Motor Cars, Maranello, Italy home of Ferrari, and all the way to Yokohoma, Japan the home of Nissan. These cars of the world are all unique yet Serviceable locally

Delahaye began experimenting with belt-driven cars while at the Brethon locomotive works, at Tours, in 1894. These experiments encouraged an entry in the 1896 Paris–Marseille–Paris race, held between 24 September-3 October 1896, fielding one car for himself and one for sportsman Ernest Archdeacon. The winning Panhard averaged 15.7 mph (25.3 km/h); Archdeacon came sixth, averaging 14 mph (23 km/h), while Delahaye himself was eighth, averaging 12.5 mph (20.1 km/h).

In 1934, Delahaye set eighteen class records at Montlhéry, in a specially-prepared, stripped and streamlined 18 Sport. They also introduced the 134N, a 12cv car with a 2.15-litre four-cylinder engine, and the 18cv Type 138, powered by a 3.2-litre six — both engines derived from their successful truck engines. In 1935, success in the Alpine Trial led to the introduction of the sporting Type 135 "Coupe des Alpes". By the end of 1935, Delahaye had won eighteen minor French sports car events and a number of hill-climbs, and came fifth at Le Mans. Delahaye ran four 160 hp (120 kW; 160 PS) cars (based on the Type 135)[8] in the 1936 Ulster TT, placing second to Bugatti, and entered four at the Belgian 24 Hours, coming 2-3-4-5 behind an Alfa Romeo

The Nissan S130 chassis was sold as the Datsun 280ZX, Nissan Fairlady Z and Nissan Fairlady 280Z, depending on the market. It was a sports coupé produced from 1978 to 1983. It was the second generation Z-car, replacing the Datsun 260Z/280Z in late 1978. The 280ZX was the first time where the "By Nissan" subscript was badged alongside the Datsun logo, along with Nissan trucks. The 280ZX was Motor Trend's Import Car of the Year for 1979. The 280ZX was replaced by the Nissan 300ZX in 1984.

The 280ZX was a complete redesign, retaining only the L28 inline-6 engine and other driveline components from the 280Z. Both two-seater and four-seater (2+2) designs were offered. With a focus on the oil crisis of the late 1970s, Nissan improved fuel economy, emissions, and aerodynamics over the first generation Z-Cars. In addition, high-end audio systems were standard.

The 280ZX was branded in the American and Australian markets as the "Datsun 280ZX"; and in the local Japanese market as the "Fairlady Z". For the 1979 model year in the American market, it was co-branded "Datsun by Nissan" through the 1983 model year. These were considered transition years as Nissan began to phase in their new global brand under the Nissan name. The Japanese market got both 2.0 L and 2.8 L engines. The 2.0 L-engined Fairlady 200Z used the L20 engine common in Nissan family cars of the same era. Export markets all got the L28-powered version. The preference for two litre engines in the Japanese market is a by-product of taxation laws.

This content is for informational purposes only. Any opinions and representations expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Sam Smyth individually or his company and or his employees. You are encouraged to seek any advise from your own sources. Sam is an independent service specialist, if you would like, please call him for his opinion.